Top 5 VIDEO: May 7, 2015

In this week’s Top 5 video, Catherine Wagley and Ed Schad wonder whether Mel Bochner is still at the top of his game, wax poetic about J.M.W. Turner and admit that Anthony Lepore’s new show at Ghebaly is way better than they expected. See a round-up of the week’s shows below.

From Milena Bonilla: Low-Intensity Operations. Courtesy of the artist and Mistake Room.

From Milena Bonilla: Low-Intensity Operations. Courtesy of the artist and Mistake Room.

5. “Milena Bonilla: Low-Intensity Operations” at The Mistake Room

The new work by Milena Bonilla, a Colombian artist based in Amsterdam, is all about strange after effects of political moves or realities. One of her videos explores the effect the iron curtain had on the genetics of actual deer.

Mel Bochner's It Doesn't Get Any Better Than This (2015). Courtesy the artist and Marc Selwyn Fine Art.

Mel Bochner’s It Doesn’t Get Any Better Than This
(2015). Courtesy the artist and Marc Selwyn Fine Art.

4. Mel Bochner at Marc Selwyn

Old school conceptualist Mel Bochner, known for his text paintings, included some angsty, pessimistic phrases in his drippy new paintings: “Broke, Busted, Belly-up…”

Photos from the panel discussion Talking About Aphasia. Courtesy 356 Mission.

Photos from the panel discussion Talking About Aphasia. Courtesy 356 Mission.

3. Kerry Tribe’s “The Loste Note” at 356 Mission

The first room of Kerry Tribe’s new show is all careful sculptures made of filming equipment. The second is a partially animated, highly produced film narrated by victims of Aphasia, a language disorder that affects a people’s ability to communicate effectively.

J. M. W. Turner's Peace—Burial at Sea, 1842. Courtesy of Tate: Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856. Photo © Tate, London 2014

J. M. W. Turner’s Peace—Burial at Sea, 1842. Courtesy of Tate: Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856. Photo © Tate, London 2014.

2. “J.M.W Turner: Painting Set Free” at The Getty

J.M.W. Turner’s unfinished paintings are among the best parts of this sprawling show. They were made late in his life, mostly in the mid-1840s, and they’re great up close.

Anthony Lepore's photograph of his Bikini Factory studio. Courtesy of the artist.

Anthony Lepore’s photograph of his Bikini Factory studio. Courtesy of the artist.

1. “Anthony Lepore: Bikini Factory” at Francois Ghebaly Gallery

Anthony Lepore made this work in an actual Bikini Factory, which his grandfather passed down to his father. Lepore has had his studio there for a few years, and his new photographs incorporate the textures, patterns and equipment he sees in the factory. It’s pretty playful work, even if it is in part a meditation on labor.

also by Glasstire

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